Amazing News, November 2018

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Do You Get Enough Exercise?

A quarter of the world’s adults don’t get enough exercise, according to a new study conducted by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and published in The Lancet Global Health.

A quarter of the world’s adults don’t get enough exercise, according to a new study
conducted by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and published in The Lancet Global Health. The study found that 27.5% of people across the globe don’t meet the WHO’s physical activity guidelines of 75 minutes of vigorous exercise or 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week. The WHO’s study was based on data from 358 surveys conducted between 2001 and 2016, including 1.9 million people from 168 countries. Although more data was available for high-income than low-income countries, the study group represented 96% of the world’s population. Each of the surveys asked participants about how much physical activity they did through work, household tasks, transportation and leisure time. During the study period, high-income Western nations saw physical inactivity rates increase from almost 31% to almost 37%, while rates remained stable—around 16%—in low-income countries. On the whole, the researchers also found that women get less exercise than men. Globally, 25.5% of men did not meet physical activity guidelines, compared to 31.5% of women. That discrepancy, the authors write, is likely related to differing gender norms related to work and recreation around the world, as well as safety and accessibility issues in many countries that prevent women from exercising. Exercise is one of the best ways to improve health and longevity and prevent chronic disease.

Sneaky Signs of B12 Deficiency

Vitamin B12 plays a role in the formation of red blood cells and is important for the functioning of our brain and nervous system.

Vitamin B12 plays a role in the formation of red blood cells and is important for the functioning of our brain and nervous system. However, estimates suggest between 1.5 and 15 percent of the U.S. population are deficient in B12, although the signs may not be readily obvious. One of the warning signals of a deficiency is bad breath, revealed Craig Maxwell, DO, medical director with the Integrative Medical Center in Metamora, Indiana. Symptoms like dizziness, prickling in the feet or hands, changes in coordination, or a swollen or inflamed tongue are some of the other sneaky signs. The best way to get vitamin B12 is through diet. Harvard Health recommends eating foods like salmon, tuna, beef, and nonfat Greek yogurt. When it’s not possible to get enough vitamin B12 from food, supplementation is recommended. While the RDA of vitamin B-12 for adults is 2.4 micrograms, you can safely take higher doses. Your body absorbs only as much as it needs, and any excess passes through your urine.

More reasons to eat Cherries

Want to tame inflammation, lower blood pressure, and get a better night’s sleep? Sweet cherries can help, according to a research review published in the March 2018 issue of the journal Nutrients.

Want to tame inflammation, lower blood pressure, and get a better night’s sleep? Sweet cherries can help, according to a research review published in the March 2018 issue of the journal Nutrients. Scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the University of California, Davis, examined 29 published human trials and found that, among study subjects who consumed sweet cherries, the health benefits included decreased oxidative stress and inflammation; fewer attacks of gout; lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure; and improved sleep, anxiety, and mood. Sweet cherries are low in calories, but deliver high concentrations of nutrients and bioactive components, including fiber, polyphenols, melatonin, carotenoids, vitamin C, and potassium, which may explain many of their health benefits. 

1 in 10

The number of children in the United States who have been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to findings, published in JAMA Network Open. ADHD is being diagnosed more frequently than it was even two decades ago.

Moderate Carb Intake could help you Live Longer

Diets both low and high in carbohydrates have been linked to an increase in mortality, while moderate consumers of carbohydrates have the lowest risk of mortality.

Diets both low and high in carbohydrates have been linked to an increase in mortality, while moderate consumers of carbohydrates have the lowest risk of mortality. Eating carbs in moderation seems to be optimal for health and longevity, suggests new research published in The Lancet Public Health journal. Less than 40 percent or more than 70 percent of your energy—or calories—coming from carbohydrates was associated with the greatest risk of mortality. Eating moderate levels between that range offered the best options for a healthy lifespan. The lowest risk of an early death was seen where carbs made up 50 to 55 percent of a person’s diet, according to the study. Here’s the twist: According to the researchers, low-carb diets where carbs are replaced with animal meat, full of animal protein and fat, lead to early death. However, low-carb diets packed with protein and fat from plant-based sources like veggies, whole grains, and nuts do not. “Our data suggests that animal-based low-carbohydrate diets, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, might be associated with shorter overall life span and should be discouraged,” said lead researcher Dr. Sara Seidelmann.

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