Your Supplement Questions, Answered! - Amazing Wellness Magazine | The Vitamin Shoppe

Your Supplement Questions, Answered!

Integrative medicine expert Tieraona Low Dog, MD, gets to the bottom of your most-asked questions.
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Integrative medicine expert Tieraona Low Dog, MD, gets to the bottom of your most-asked questions.

When it comes to taking your vitamins, minerals, fish oils, probiotics, and other supplements, you have questions. Lots of them! Questions like, What’s the best time of day to take them? Can you take them all at once? What’s the best place to store them? We heard you. We turned to Tieraona Low Dog, MD, author of Fortify Your Life: Your Guide to Vitamins, Minerals, and More, for answers to some of your most common queries. 

How can I be sure I’m buying a quality supplement?

Stick with reputable brands manufactured in the U.S. Most of the really disturbing news about “supplements” is not about vitamins, minerals, or common nutritional supplements, which generally contain what they claim on their labels. Steer clear of herbal products coming out of China and India that have been found on numerous occasions to be adulterated with undeclared prescription drugs, as well as containing high levels of lead, mercury, an/or arsenic.

Also, look for third-party seals such as the United States Pharmacopeia, a nonprofit scientific organization that sets standards for the identity, strength, quality, and purity of dietary supplements manufactured, distributed, and consumed worldwide; NSF  znternational, an independent organization of scientists and public health experts that sets standards for supplements and tests and certifies them; and Consumer Labs, a private company that tests numerous branded products and allows companies that pass its quality tests to use its seal.

How do I know label claims are accurate?

When it comes to taking your vitamins, minerals, fish oils, probiotics, and other supplements, you have questions. Lots of them!

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has strict rules about what companies can say about supplements. Manufacturers can claim that a supplement supports general well-being or the normal structure or function of the human body. For instance, such statements as “Calcium builds strong bones” or “Antioxidants maintain cell integrity” are permitted. However, labels (and advertisements) cannot claim that a supplement treats or cures diseases. So, while there are randomized controlled trials that demonstrate the herb St. John’s wort is effective for the treatment of depression, for example, a manufacturer cannot say this on the label. Instead, the label would have to say something like, “St. John’s wort supports a healthy mood.”

The daily value (DV) is a percentage, calculated on the average recommended daily allowance (RDA) for adults. For each nutrient, there is only one DV for everyone 4 years of age or older. That means the DV does not distinguish between the nutritional needs of an 80-year-old man, a 29-year-old woman, or a 6-year-old child. Be aware that your RDA might be higher or lower than the DV. For example, the DV for vitamin D is 400 IU, whereas the RDA for anyone from 12 months to 70 years of age is 600 IU—and 800 IU if you’re over the age of 70. All vitamins will list 400 IU as 100 percent of the DV, yet just as an example of how general the DV is, a 75-year-old man would actually need double that amount.

What you won’t find on labels is information about the upper limit (UL), which is the tolerable upper intake level for a given nutrient. In other words, the UL is the highest daily intake of a particular nutrient unlikely to pose a risk of adverse health effects to almost all people in the general population, as determined by the Food and Nutrition Board. The UL represents total intake of a vitamin or mineral from food, beverages, and supplements, and differs for infants, children, teenagers, men and women of all ages, and pregnant and nursing women. For a chart detailing the tolerable upper intake levels of vitamins and minerals, go to The National Institutes of Health website (nih.gov), or refer to my book, Fortify Your Life.

What’s the best form (liquid, pill, powder, etc.) to take?

There advantages (and disadvantages) of each.

Tablets: They’re cost-effective, shelf-stable, and have longer expiration dates. If you have a healthy digestive tract and are not taking medications such as proton pump inhibitors (Nexium, Prilosec) that shut off your production of stomach acid, your digestive system shouldn’t have any problem breaking down a supplement tablet made by a reputable manufacturer. One downside: Tablets can be difficult to swallow, However, this can be easily remedied by using a pill slicer to cut your tablets in half.

Capsules: They’re easy to swallow and break down quickly in the stomach. You can also open capsules and put the ingredients into a smoothie, applesauce or yogurt, making capsules an attractive option for children or those who have difficulty swallowing. Vegetarians/vegans take note: Although most supplement manufacturers use capsules made from vegetable material (veggie caps), some may contain gelatin derived from animals. Check the labels.

Softgels: These smooth, one-piece capsules are designed to hold liquid or oil-based preparations, such as vitamin E or fish oil. They’re easy to swallow and, because they are airtight, offer a long shelf life. Unlike capsules, they are currently made almost exclusively from gelatin from animal sources, so are not suitable for vegetarians/vegans.

Chewables: If you like to take your supplements in the form of gummy bears, don’t be embarrassed. You aren’t the only one! Chewables are one of the fastest-growing and most popular categories of dietary supplements. Most contain some form of sweetener and/or flavoring, which could be either natural or artificial—so read labels closely. And vegans and those sensitive to dairy should be aware that some chewable supplements contain lactic acid, which may have been derived from dairy.

Lozenges: Small tablets designed to dissolve slowly in the mouth, lozenges are generally used to soothe a cough or sore throat. Some vitamin or mineral supplements are available in lozenge form as an alternative to chewables. Be aware that some contain some type of sweetener and may also contain flavorings or colorings. Keep them away from young children who may confuse them with candy.

Powders: Powders are useful when you want to use larger amounts of a supplement. For example, the amount of inositol generally used for anxiety or sleep is typically 6 to 12 grams, or 2 to 4 teaspoons. That would be anywhere from 12 to 24 capsules per day! Powders are easily added to smoothies and food and have a decent shelf life. The downside is that they are less convenient when traveling or on the go.

Liquids: Some liquid vitamins and minerals are available in a sublingual form, drops that are placed under the tongue for rapid absorption. A classic example is vitamin B12. Liquids allow flexibility when it comes to dosing, and you don’t have to worry about absorption issues. However, they have a shorter shelf life and are harder to transport as many need to be refrigerated after opening.

Topicals: Many creams, gels, lotions, and ointments contain vitamins, minerals, nutraceuticals, and herbal ingredients. Many people open a vitamin E capsule and apply it to prevent scarring when skin has been injured. Epsom salts can deliver magnesium through the skin and relax sore muscles. Calendula ointment is commonly used for minor cuts and wounds.

Should I take all my supplements at once?

Some nutrients can enhance or diminish the absorption of other nutrients. Large amounts of calcium (250 mg or more) can impair the absorption of iron, while vitamin C increases it. Interestingly, in the Southwest, people like to eat beans, which are high in iron, with chili peppers, which are packed with vitamin C. This traditional mixture maximizes the absorption of plant-based iron, which is less absorbable than the iron found in meat. Taking large doses of calcium or magnesium (250 mg or more) can compete with the absorption of other minerals, including each other. I generally recommend taking magnesium at bedtime to help with sleep and relaxation. Take your multivitamin-mineral supplement at least two hours apart from your calcium or magnesium.

Are “whole food” vitamins worth it?

The terms “whole food” or “food based” refer to vitamins that have undergone a fermenting process using yeast. These products are made by feeding vitamins (some natural, some synthetic) to yeast in a liquid broth solution. As the yeast grows, it incorporates the vitamins and minerals into its cellular structure. The yeast is then killed and dried, and the vitamins pressed into capsules, liquids, or powders. The theory is that the nutrients incorporated into the yeast are now in a highly bioavailable form. On the label, you will usually see ingredients listed as “derived from yeast” or “from S. cerevisiae.” Are these food-based or bio-transformed products worth the extra price? Many people think so, as this is one of the fastest growing segments in the supplement industry. I personally take a multivitamin-mineral made using this type of process. In some cases, though, there is no difference between a synthetic and natural vitamin where the body is concerned. This is the case with vitamin C. If your supplement contains more than 100 mg of vitamin C, chances are high you’re getting at least some synthetic vitamin C. However, natural and synthetic ascorbic acid are chemically identical, and there are no known differences in their biological activities or bioavailability.

What’s the best time of day to take your vitamins?

Most vitamins and mineral supplements are best taken with food to aid their dissolution and absorption. Iron supplements are best taken with food to avoid stomach upset. Multivitamin-mineral supplements and vitamins C, E, and B-complex can all be taken together at the same meal. I recommend taking them with breakfast. Take larger amounts of calcium or magnesium several hours apart from other minerals. Calcium carbonate must be taken with food, whereas calcium citrate does not need to be. I recommend the latter. It’s best to take fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) and fish oil with a meal containing fat. One study found that taking vitamin D with dinner instead of breakfast increased vitamin D by about 50 percent!

There are a few supplements that should be taken on an empty stomach. Herbal bitters are often taken 20 minutes before a meal to “prime” the digestive tract, revving up the production of stomach acid and alerting the pancreas that food is coming. Enzymes should be taken during or immediately after a meal.

I have food allergies. What should I watch out for?

Fillers are one area of concern when it comes to allergies. Rice flour is typically used as a filler because it is hypoallergenic, but cornstarch, lactose, or other potential allergens could be present. If you have a soy allergy, avoid product that list lecithin on the label. Sometimes a label will list vegetable glaze or vegetable coating, which could be derived from corn—a problem for some people and also possibly genetically modified. Read labels carefully.

I’m a vegetarian. How do I know my supplement is, too?

Gelatin is derived from pig or cattle; if the label lists gelatin, the supplement contains an animal product. Look for vegetarian or vegan capsules if this matters to you. Glycerin is often used as a preservative in liquids and as a softener in softgels, and can be derived from animals or plants. If you are vegetarian, make sure you check the label to ensure it lists vegetable glycerin.

Tips for Storing & Organizing Supplements

Tips for storing and organizing supplements.

For the majority of supplements, store in a cool, dry place (such as a kitchen cupboard). And don’t throw out the little packet inside—this keeps out moisture and prevents clumping. Some probiotics need to be refrigerated; check labels.

On the other hand, you shouldn’t store supplements in the bathroom medicine cabinet, as this is the room that sees the most humidity and changes in temperature, which can damage and/or compromise the potency and efficacy of your supplements.

Don’t store fish oil softgels in the refrigerator. This can result in small holes in the softgel coating and cause premature spoilage. The freezer, however, is a good option for fish oil softgels.

Anatomy of a Dietary Supplement Label 

  1. Product name
  2. Manufacturer’s name
  3. Manufacturer’s claims
  4. Method of delivery
  5. “Supplement Facts” or ingredients
  6. Serving information
  7. Units of measurement
  8. Percentage Daily Value (DV)
  9. Other ingredients
  10. Suggested use
  11. Cautions and warnings
  12. Manufacturer’s contact information
  13. Lot number
  14. Expiration date
  15. Quality seals

Turn Off Stress Better

Too many of us are not giving our body the No. 1 resource it needs to turn off stress—magnesium.

Natural Vitality Natural Calm

Ashley Koff, RD, is an award-winning nutrition expert, author, speaker, and health advocate based in Washington D.C.

Too many of us are not giving our body the No. 1 resource it needs to turn off stress—magnesium. When stress happens, calcium enters our cells; put simply, magnesium needs to be there to push it back out, essentially “turning off” the stress response. While you should eat foods rich in magnesium, you will also want to ensure that you meet your daily needs with a quality magnesium supplement. NATURAL VITALITY NATURAL CALM provides an easy-to-absorb source in a powder that’s easy to take. 

MEET THE EXPERT: Ashley Koff, RD, is an award-winning nutrition expert, author, speaker, and health advocate based in Washington D.C.

Maximize your Health

SOLGAR GENTLE IRON is formulated for enhanced absorption and is gentle on your system.

Solgar Gentle Iron

Susan Hazels Mitmesser, PhD, is a seasoned research scientist with nutritional biochemistry expertise in various industries, academia, and clinical settings.

Iron is an essential trace mineral found in most of our cells. Most of the metabolically active iron in the human body is in hemoglobin and circulating throughout the body via red blood cells. Hemoglobin’s role is to carry oxygen from the lungs to other tissues. Iron is also a component of myoglobin, which is the protein that provides oxygen to the muscles. As a cofactor, iron is also required for the synthesis of brain neurotransmitters, including dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. SOLGAR GENTLE IRON is formulated for enhanced absorption and is gentle on your system.

MEET THE EXPERT: Susan Hazels Mitmesser, PhD, is a seasoned research scientist with nutritional biochemistry expertise in various industries, academia, and clinical settings. 

Consider Fermented Supplements

GET REAL NUTRITION FERMENTED SUPERJUICE FORMULAS, including Immune Cleanse, Fit, and Brain, deliver 33 organic fermented veggie and fruit juices.

Real Nutrition Fermented Superjuice Formulas

Jordan Rubin is the co-founder of Ancient Nutrition and the New York Times bestselling author of The Maker’s Diet, and 25 additional titles.

Fermentation is an ancient process used to break down food into more absorbable components. This process “predigests” nutrients so they are more bioavailable. During fermentation, key vitamins are created, particularly B vitamins, as well as probiotics. GET REAL NUTRITION FERMENTED SUPERJUICE FORMULAS, including Immune Cleanse, Fit, and Brain, deliver 33 organic fermented veggie and fruit juices. Mix one or more scoops per day with your favorite beverage or create a powerful SuperJuice-infused green smoothie.

MEET THE EXPERT: Jordan Rubin is the co-founder of Ancient Nutrition and the New York Times bestselling author of The Maker’s Diet, and 25 additional titles.

Filler-Free Supplements

PARADISE HERBS ORAC-ENERGY EARTH’S BLEND ONE DAILY SUPERFOOD MULTIVITAMIN is free of binders, fillers, and magnesium stearate or stearic acid (which may inhibit absorption).

Paradise Herbs Orac-Energy Earth's Blend One Daily Superfood Multivitamin

Scott Bias is the founder of Paradise Herbs & Essentials, Inc., based in Huntington Beach, Calif.

Look for supplements that are made without fillers. PARADISE HERBS ORAC-ENERGY EARTH’S BLEND ONE DAILY SUPERFOOD MULTIVITAMIN is free of binders, fillers, and magnesium stearate or stearic acid (which may inhibit absorption). Also, look for supplements made using vegetarian capsules—they tend to dissolve more quickly in the digestive tract.

MEET THE EXPERT: Scott Bias is the founder of Paradise Herbs & Essentials, Inc., based in Huntington Beach, Calif.  

Fortify Your Life book cover

Tieraona Low Dog, MD

Is a leading expert in integrative medicine and member of the American Board of Integrative Medicine and the Academy of Women’s Health. She is the author of several books on natural health, including Healthy at Home, Life is Your Best Medicine, and Fortify Your Life.

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